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Diary of a Philosophy Student by Beauvoir Simone; Klaw Barbara; Simons Margaret A

Diary of a Philosophy Student by Beauvoir Simone; Klaw Barbara; Simons Margaret A

Author:Beauvoir, Simone; Klaw, Barbara; Simons, Margaret A.
Language: eng
Format: epub
Publisher: University of Illinois Press


NOTES

1. Beauvoir's Diary of a Philosophy Student 1926–27, published in 2006, (henceforth Diary 1) is the first volume of the annotated English translation of the French transcription that was established and approved for the English translation of Beauvoir's 1926–30 diary. In 2008, the published French version of that same manuscript from 1926–1930, Cahiers de jeunesse, (henceforth CJ) appeared. In this 2nd volume of the annotated English translation of Beauvoir's 1926–1930 diary, I thus include translations for and notes on the differences between the transcription that was established and approved for the translation of the first volume of the annotated English translation and the published French version of the 1926–1930 diary. My translations of Sylvie Le Bon de Beauvoir's additional notes are consistently preceded by her name and followed by the page number in CJ where they appear. All other notes and annotations are my own unless otherwise indicated.

2. Jacques Champigneulles is Beauvoir's slightly older cousin, who becomes her intellectual mentor during her adolescence and her first childhood sweetheart. Contrary to her autobiographical version of their childhood love affair in Mémoires, she still hoped to marry him until 1930 when he decided to marry another woman. See Klaw, “Simone de Beauvoir, Cousin Jacques du journal intime aux Mémoires, 84–91.”

3. In her 1926–1930 diary, Beauvoir reserves the use of the informal word, often reserved for only the closest of friends, for “you” (tu) for her cousin Jacques. Except for Jacques Champigneulles and herself, Beauvoir uses the more formal pronoun “vous” to address others in her diary as “you.” In the sixth and seventh notebooks, I have signaled in brackets the presence of (tu) or (toi) or (te) at the first occurrence of each section addressing Jacques or I have simply added the name, Jacques, to facilitate reading.

4. What I have transcribed as “au moment où ils éclorent,” and translated as “at the moment when they blossomed,” appears in the French edition as “au moment où ils naquirent,” which could translate literally as “at the moment when they were born” (CJ 464).

5. Sylvie Le Bon de Beauvoir: During this same month, Simone de Beauvoir had returned to Gagnepan (CJ 464); Zaza is Elisabeth Lacoin, Beauvoir's first real school friend from the time Zaza was eleven until her death in 1929. Beauvoir calls her Elisabeth Mabille in Mémoires. For a better understanding of their friendship, see Lacoin, Zaza.

6. La Porte Étroite is a bookstore at 10, rue Bonaparte in Paris.

7. The Apollo is a music hall in Paris; Sylvie Le Bon de Beauvoir: Maurice de Chevalier was about to leave for Hollywood to star in the 1929 film, The Love Parade (CJ 465). Chevalier (1888–1972), the French actor and popular entertainer who started performing with the female star Mistinguett at the Folies Bergères in 1909, met with great success in France. By 1929 he was also a resident of Hollywood and starred in American films.

8. The “your soul” (ton âme) referred to in this passage is most likely Jacques, the only person Beauvoir referred to in the second person singular or “tu” in her 1926–1927 diary.



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